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Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Religion has always been key to the personal identity of so many, but also to world history, contemporary politics and the current world stage. RS at JAGS responds by being wide-ranging and thought-provoking.

KS3 pupils are introduced to a huge variety of religious phenomena, allowing them to develop their own responses and values, whilst alerting them to the diversities of the world around them, including non-religious world views. They address philosophical questions about the existence of God, the purpose of being and the nature of religious language and examine the challenges to religion posed by science. Pupils investigate the world's major religions and consider religion's place in modern, multicultural societies, promoting a respectful and critical tolerance of global difference. They have the opportunity to handle artefacts and witness faith in action, encouraging them to understand, respect and embrace cultures different from their own.

RS public examination courses are popular. GCSE pupils study two discrete religions (currently Judaism and Christianity) and also delve into an appreciation of how religious beliefs and teachings inform attitudes to a variety of themes, such as relationships and families, peace and conflict, crime and punishment, human rights and social justice, the origin and value of life and the existence of God. A Level students study a discrete religion in far greater theological depth, alongside units on the Philosophy of Religion and Ethics. This A level course enables students to develop a wide range of skills beneficial for furthering their studies at university.

Well done to Maddy, Rosie and Barbora. Two sleeps and one weekend’s work in late November 2016 and their film was born. Save RS embraces the hot topic of what should and shouldn’t be in the school curriculum. You’ll have to watch it to find out how they achieve their goal. The content and especially the creative approach impressed the judges at the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge and Maddy, Rosie and Barbora in Y9 were surprised and delighted to hear that they had been awarded first place in the Cambridge Religion on Film Competition.

Also, congratulations to Clara Tuffrey and Becky Whant (Yr 12) for their film Debating Euthanasia: a Christian Perspective. The film placed in joint second as the judges were particularly impressed by the breadth of Clara and Becky's interviews.

Positive relationships, energetic, dynamic delivery and animated classroom discussion are key to all lessons, stimulating independent learning and critical thinking skills as part and parcel of a huge variety of homework activities. The development of independent high order thinking and accurate written and verbal communication (especially of conceptual material) is a high priority for each and every girl.

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